New cars are selling for record-breaking high prices. The average sticker price of a new car was over $41,000 in June—the first time it has ever crossed that mark.

And sticker price isn’t the price most people pay. Americans are accustomed to negotiating the price of a new car and paying less than the list price.

That isn’t happening the way we’re used to. When our analysts compared the average transaction price (the price people actually paid) to the sticker price for 256 models of car, we found 84 that were selling for over MSRP in May.

The numbers may well be even worse when June’s results are tallied. Dealers went into July with the shortest supply of new cars they’ve had to sell since we first began tracking nationwide inventory more than four decades ago.

Yet, shortage or not, Americans are still car shopping. With travel restrictions lifting and an economic improvement underway, demand for new cars remains high. Many buyers are simply entering the negotiation process expecting to pay more than the listed price.

Are higher than MSRP prices a new normal? Not necessarily.

Our analysts also found plenty of cars still selling for well under their suggested prices.

Finding one takes a little sleuthing. They include discontinued models (see the Lincoln Continental, canceled but still available on some dealership lots). Dealers are often willing to accept a lower offer to move a discontinued car off the lot and replace it with something still being advertised.

They also include models recently replaced by an updated version. There’s an excellent all-new 2022 Infiniti QX60 appearing in dealerships, for instance…so you can get a steal on the 2021 model, which is also quite good.

Related: As new car inventory dries up, here are the ones that are almost impossible to get

But the list includes surprising variety. You’re not going to find a pickup truck or a minivan on it. But there are affordable family cars, luxury SUVs, and even one electric car still selling for significant discounts.

10 cars that sold for the biggest discount off MSRP:

Acura RLX

78% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $57,807

Average transaction price: $44,964

Dropped after 2020 model year

Jaguar XE

The Jaguar XE

Jaguar

83% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $48,605

Average transaction price: $40,104

Infiniti QX60

85% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $51,213

Average transaction price: $44,478

2021 model replaced by all-new 2022

Lincoln Continental

87% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $55,478

Average transaction price: $48,410

Dropped after 2020 model year

Kia Optima

88% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $32,211

Average transaction price: $28,324

Kia
000270,
-0.58%

Optima replaced by all-new K5 in 2021 model year

Also see: If you’re shopping for a used car, these are your best bets

Jaguar I-Pace

89% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $80,725

Average transaction price: $71,861

Volkswagen Arteon

The VW Arteon

Volkswagen

89% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $44,941

Average transaction price, VW
VWAGY,
+0.19%

Arteon: $40,191

Infiniti Q50

89% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $48,404

Average transaction price: $43,315

Nissan Pathfinder

90% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $41,002

Average transaction price: $36,737

2021 Nissan
NSANY,
+1.17%

Pathfinder replaced by all-new 2022

See: The 10 most fun SUVs

Volvo S60

90% of MSRP

Average sticker price: $48,147

Average transaction price: $43,241

This story originally ran on KBB.com.

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